Forensic science class conducts mock crime scene

Seniors+Kaitlynn+Sayles+and+Tanner+Bonneau+examine+the+mock+crime+scene+in+Anglin%27s+classroom+on+Oct.+22.+
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Forensic science class conducts mock crime scene

Seniors Kaitlynn Sayles and Tanner Bonneau examine the mock crime scene in Anglin's classroom on Oct. 22.

Seniors Kaitlynn Sayles and Tanner Bonneau examine the mock crime scene in Anglin's classroom on Oct. 22.

Nicholas Sanchez

Seniors Kaitlynn Sayles and Tanner Bonneau examine the mock crime scene in Anglin's classroom on Oct. 22.

Nicholas Sanchez

Nicholas Sanchez

Seniors Kaitlynn Sayles and Tanner Bonneau examine the mock crime scene in Anglin's classroom on Oct. 22.

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As a continuation of the previous lessons taught in class about crime scene education, forensics teachers Danielle Anglin and Stephanie Keen set up a mock crime scene as a project grade activity where students worked together and learned how to analyze the scene. Students were divided into groups and assigned to certain assignments, such as DNA analysis, note-taking or sketching the crime scene. Playing the roles of investigators, students were asked to follow the procedures that are critical to processing a crime scene. Accurate measurements, photographs and important data pertaining to the evidence had to be recorded in order to properly evaluate the case.

“The idea was put together by Ms. Keen who created the curriculum for Forensics,” Anglin said. “Each year we try to add more details to make it as realistic as possible within the realm of a classroom setting.”

The mock crime scene was placed in Anglin’s classroom, giving students an insight of the responsibilities of a crime scene investigator and a lifelike depiction of what a crime scene might actually look like. 

“It took approximately two days to completely set up. Two students assisted with the process by drawing the outline [of the victim], footprints, and blood splatter,” Anglin said.

Students put their knowledge into practice, actively participating and attaining data in order to create a simulated case file. Many students bonded over the assignment, teaming up to process the fictional crime.

“Working with people that I [had] never seen myself working with put me outside of my comfort zone,” junior Emma Sacco said. 

Students commented on their overall experience of working on the activity and how they got along with their groups. 

“I think that this activity was interesting and it shows how hard they have to work to solve a crime. I enjoyed working with my group and brought us closer to each other and we’ve now become friends, ” senior Hannah Merritt said.

“The activity as a whole was lots of fun and I can’t wait to do something like this again,” Sacco said.

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