Dorian dampens Labor Day weekend

Students and staff prepare for an uncertain course of the now Category 4 storm.

Journalism+students+%0Afinish+last+minute+work+on+Aug.+30.+By+the+end+of+the+day%2C+all+computers+and+electronics+were+covered+with+garbage+bags+and+moved+off+the+floor+and+away+from+windows+in+preparation+for+Hurricane+Dorian.+
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Dorian dampens Labor Day weekend

Journalism students 
finish last minute work on Aug. 30. By the end of the day, all computers and electronics were covered with garbage bags and moved off the floor and away from windows in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.

Journalism students finish last minute work on Aug. 30. By the end of the day, all computers and electronics were covered with garbage bags and moved off the floor and away from windows in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.

Anna Forst

Journalism students finish last minute work on Aug. 30. By the end of the day, all computers and electronics were covered with garbage bags and moved off the floor and away from windows in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.

Anna Forst

Anna Forst

Journalism students finish last minute work on Aug. 30. By the end of the day, all computers and electronics were covered with garbage bags and moved off the floor and away from windows in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.

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With the first long weekend of the school year approaching, students were anticipating enjoyable days at the beach and hanging out at night. Instead, many of them are now helping their families prepare for Hurricane Dorian. 

“It’s not the weekend I had hoped for, but hopefully it won’t be as bad as they are predicting,” senior Nick Pineda said. 

With Hurricane Dorian’s approach, water supplies are drastically decreasing and long lines are frequenting gas stations. The tropical storm has grown into a category two hurricane as of 5 a.m. Friday morning. 

After the horrors of Hurricane Irma two years ago, Floridians fear the same fate with Dorian. Gas station lines are dozens of cars long, even days before the actual storm is expected to hit. Publix was jammed early in the week with people scrambling for water and non-perishable food. In Home Depot, people rush to buy last minute safety items, such as sandbags and generators.

“I’m putting up my hurricane shutters, buying some goods in advance, some water, some packaged foods that in case of emergencies, we will be alright in [our] house,” sophomore Noah Kopelwitz said. 

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency for all Florida counties to allow easier delivery of gas and water across the state. 

“While forecasts are unclear about impacts to Florida, all residents should begin preparing for the Hurricane. This includes having [seven] days of food, water and medicine,” he tweeted.  

With the uncertainty of Dorian, there has been no word on Broward County school closures, while Palm Beach announced they will close on Tuesday. Administration encourages students to watch the news and listen for superintendent Robert Runcie’s official announcement.

Students are not the only ones threatened by the approaching storm.

“To prepare, I plan on buying tons of water, locking down my barn to protect my goats and chickens [and] making sure my horse barn is on lock down as well,” AP Psychology teacher Leslie Rios said.

While current National Hurricane Center’s latest forecast says the hurricane will not make landfall in South Florida, it is always important to prepare and be aware of any potential threats to Broward County. As there is a current state of emergency, Floridians must carefully watch the storm and prepare for the worst.

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